Exclusive Interview: Meet The Black Cop Who Led The Ku Klux Klan!

Published on: June 20, 2014
Photography by: National Enquirer
Exclusive Interview:  Meet The Black Cop Who Led The Ku Klux Klan!

The ENQUIRER uncovers the courageous detective who infiltrated the KKK as undercover cop RON STALLWORTH tells ALL in an explosive white knuckle interview.

In an incredible act of courage, black police officer Ron Stallworth risked his life by infiltrating the Ku Klux Klan. Not only did he successfully gather intelligence, he actually rose to become leader of his local KKK chapter in Colorado.

“I saw an ad in the paper recruiting members for the KKK,” he told The National ENQUIRER in an exclusive interview.

“As an intelligence detective, it was my job to work with subversive groups, and they are a domestic terrorist group. “I couldn’t let them advertise without responding. They were a threat to my city!”

Stallworth was easily able to join the hate group after conversing with members over the phone, convincing them he was white by peppering his language with “their buzzwords of hate.”

He told one white-robed hatemonger that he was furious because his sister “was dating a n-----.”

“You’re just the kind of person we’re looking for,” the enthusiastic Klansman fired back. For KKK meetings and appearances, Stallworth had a white colleague assume his identity.

Although he is a highly trained operative, there were quite a few scary moments.

One time Stallworth was working on security duty (as himself) for Grandmaster David Duke and two other Klansmen whom he’d spoken with on the phone. “I was worried they might recognize my voice,” but they did not. After successfully completing his perilous undercover mission inside the group, Stallworth came to some crucial conclusions.

“The KKK are not the brightest lightbulbs in the socket,” he said.

“We should challenge them at every opportunity. We can, as a people, defeat them.”

In the 1860s, during the Reconstruction Era of the South after the Civil War, the diabolical KKK was formed. The hate group had millions of members by the 1920s, and during the Civil Rights Movement the vicious Klan were a strong opposing force against any progress among minorities. The number of members has since trickled to the thousands.