MONKEE DAVY JONES DEAD

Published on: February 29, 2012
Photography by: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
MONKEE DAVY JONES DEAD

POP ICON DAVY JONES of The MONKEES has died suddenly at 66.

Davy’s rep confirmed the music legend died from a heart attack this morning in Indiantown, Florida. 

A former racehorse jockey, Davy, who was born in Manchester, England, first found fame in the musical “Oliver” as The Artful Dodger.  He joined The Monkees in 1965.

Jokingly referred to as the Pre-Fab Four,  The Monkees - Davy  along with Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork exploded onto NBC TV in 1966, challenging The Beatles for teen-age girl supremacy.

The Monkees also tore up the charts with monster hits  "Daydream Believer," "Pleasant Valley Sunday", "Last Train to Clarksville" and "I'm a Believer."

Just HOW popular was Davy at the peak of his Monkees fame? A name alike David Jones had to change his name to David Bowie in '66.

They also starred in the psychedelic film "Head" (1967) which was written by a young Jack Nicholson.

After a successful TV run the band disbanded only to reteam multiple times after a new generation of fans discovered The Monkees in the 1980s when the old shows were rebroadcast on MTV.

To appease his devoted legion of fans, Davy was constantly touring worldwide.  

Davy is survived by 3rd wife Jessica Pacheco -- and 4 daughters, Anabel, Talia, Sarah and Jessica, from previous marriages.

Upon hearing of his passing, fellow Monkee Mike Nesmith offered his thoughts, “David's spirit and soul live well in my heart, among all the lovely people, who remember with me the good times, and the healing times, that were created for so many, including us. I have fond memories. I wish him safe travels.”

Micky Dolenz was crushed,  "I am in a state of shock ... The time we worked together and had together is something I'll never forget. He was the brother I never had and this leaves a gigantic hole in my heart. The memories have and will last a lifetime."

Peter Tork also mourned, saying, "Adios . . . to the Manchester Cowboy."