GLEE's JANE LYNCH TELL-ALL

Published on: February 23, 2011
GLEE's JANE LYNCH TELL-ALL

The formerly closeted gay GLEE star JANE LYNCH reveals her boozy wild days in shocking tell-all memoir that'll blow your mind, The ENQUIRER has learned.
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When Glee star Jane Lynch turned 31, she knew it was time to make big changes in her life.
She was getting drunk every night and she was an unhappily closeted lesbian.

The pretty actress somehow found the strength to quit drinking cold turkey and to finally tell her parents that she was gay.

Jane's life-changing turnaround is just one of the fascinating revelations in the now openly gay entertainer's new memoir, Happy Accidents, which is due to be published in September.
In the book, the 50-year-old Emmy winner shares that she started boozing at the tender age of 14 because of low self-esteem.

"As a kid I was convinced that deep down inside, there was something wrong with me - something fundamentally broken," Jane recalls.

"It was as if I had some kind of deficit and needed to compensate for it."

But by 1991, she decided to get sober after realizing she was getting drunk every night and spending most of her days hungover.

One day, she simply poured out her last glass of wine and never looked back.
And, she says, that single decision changed her life.

"It helped me become a better friend, a better partner and a more helpful person."

As for her sexual preference, she recalls: "I didn't know what 'gay' was in high school.
"We used the word 'queer' when someone was weird - when I finally heard what it really meant, my heart sank, and I thought, 'Oh God, that's me.'"

The blonde from the Chicago area found a home in her school's choir, where the other kids accepted her, and she sang for four years.

Now, life could not be better. Jane legally married her girlfriend, psychologist Dr. Lara Embry, last May. She says that she, Lara and stepdaughter Haden, 9, love sitting around watching episodes of Glee.

In a statement about the memoir, Jane explained: "For a long time, I was anxious that the parade would pass me by, and that someone or something outside myself had all the answers.

"Having finally reached a happy place - a happy accidents place - I want to share my story with others, to let them know things aren't as bad as they fear."

Jane also admits in the book that, while she may be open about her sexuality now, she didn't come out to her parents until she was 31.

"It was my own internalized homophobia," she explains. "I didn't want to be gay. I wanted an easy life."

Now, she laughs: "I AM gay and I still have an easy life."